GLAM-WIKI 2015/Proposals/Coding da Vinci - the first open cultural data hackathon in Germany. a competition for data lovers and cultural heritage institutions alike

Uit Wikimedia
Naar navigatie springen Naar zoeken springen
Yes check.svg

This is an accepted submission for GLAM-WIKI 2015.

Submission no. GW15.1004
Title of the submission
Coding da Vinci - the first open cultural data hackathon in Germany.

a competition for data lovers and cultural heritage institutions alike

Type of submission
presentation
Author of the submission
Helene Hahn (Open Knowledge Foundation Germany), Anja Müller (Service Centre Digitalization Berlin), Barbara Fischer (Wikimedia Germany)
Country of origin
Germany
Affiliation
German Digital Library, Open Knowledge Foundation Germany, Service Centre Digitalization Berlin, Wikimedia Germany
E-mail address
helene.hahnAt sign.svgokfn.org
Username
pluscha
Twitter username
pluscha
Abstract

Coding da Vinci gives German cultural heritage institutions the possibility to meet with designers, software and game developers, to foster and share their expertise in order to realize digital projects for the cultural sphere as well as the public. Through this productive cooperation the institutions obtain new perspectives on their digital treasure troves, and the visitors experience entirely new forms of interaction with the cultural artifacts. Over 325 thousand media files were opened by the institutions for the hackathon last year, 17 projects were developed for 10 weeks and presented to the public.

Coding da Vinci is a collaborative project conducted by German Digital Library, Open Knowledge Foundation Germany, Service Centre Digitalization Berlin and Wikimedia Germany. Coding da Vinci will take place in Berlin (25th/26th April, 5th July 2015).


Detailed proposal

Coding da Vinci - the first open cultural data hackathon in Germany. a competition for data lovers and cultural heritage institutions alike

What do cultural heritage institutions gain by opening up data and content? How can these institutions benefit from new cooperations and new projects in a digital world, where knowledge sharing becomes a matter of course?

Digitization of cultural heritage has been a hot topic for some time now. More and more libraries, archives, and museums digitize their cultural treasures. Until January 2014, more than 30 million artifacts were opened through Europeana alone, Germany provided the largest share (4.5 million). Now it is time to find out what new perspectives and questions arise in the field of digital cultural heritage. Culture lovers are no longer merely consumers, but also producers of additional cultural material. The potential of digital cultural production has no boundaries. Cultural heritage is vital for our identity but it needs to be a natural part of our daily lives. Sharing knowledge by giving free access to the collections means gaining new insights, enriching data and enjoying the surprising creativity of people looking at data as “a toy”.

Last year, four organizations partnered up to organize the first open cultural data hackathon in Germany: Coding da Vinci. At Coding da Vinci we want to explore what happens if museums, archives and libraries enter the conversation with new target groups and collectively explore the potential of the digital cultural heritage.

Coding da Vinci 2014 was the first opportunity for German cultural heritage institutions to meet with designers, software and game developers, to foster and share their expertise in order to realize digital projects for the cultural sphere. Through this productive cooperation the institutions obtained new perspectives on their digital treasure troves, and the visitors could experience entirely new forms of interaction with the cultural artifacts.

16 cultural heritage institutions from all over Germany provided 24 data sets and more than 325 thousand media files – containing images, sounds, maps, videos und metadata – for the open cultural data hackathon under an open license for unrestricted reuse. The data provided was as diverse as the institutions. These data sets had previously been difficult to access, and/or not re-usable at all.

Different from other hackathons Coding da Vinci started off with a hacking weekend and was followed by a 10-week sprint. Ideas were developed into products ready to be used by the institutions and the public. 17 teams presented their projects to over 180 guests at the award ceremony in July. All developed applications were licensed under an open licence. Several museums have decided to keep on working on these projects in cooperation with the teams, broadening their perspectives, experiencing their collections in unexpected ways.

Coding da Vinci can be regarded as a blueprint for international versions of open cultural data hackathons. During our session we want to: share knowledge about the importance of cooperative projects with other organizations, the community and GLAMs (galleries, libraries, archives, museums) that want to support the open knowledge movement show “Coding da Vinci” as an example for GLAMs opening up data and content, present our lessons learned present an project overview of the participating teams, show how community contributes to free knowledge and how open content can be remixed

Coding da Vinci is a collaborative project conducted by German Digital Library, Open Knowledge Foundation Germany, Service Centre Digitalization Berlin and Wikimedia Germany.

Track
  • Collaboration


Length of presentation/talk
30 Minutes
Target audience
Beginner, intermediate, advanced level
Expected outcomes

Coding da Vinci can be regarded as a blueprint for international versions of open cultural data hackathons. During our session we want to: share knowledge about the importance of cooperative projects with other organizations, the community and GLAMs (galleries, libraries, archives, museums) that want to support the open knowledge movement show “Coding da Vinci” as an example for GLAMs opening up data and content, present our lessons learned present an project overview of the participating teams, show how community contributes to free knowledge and how open content can be remixed

Will you attend GLAM-WIKI 2015 if your submission is not accepted?
yes
Slides or further information (optional)
/
Special requests
/


Interested attendees

If you are interested in attending this session, please sign with your username below. This will help reviewers to decide which sessions are of high interest. Sign with four tildes. (~~~~).

  1. Multichill (overleg) 1 mrt 2015 11:10 (CET)[reageer]
  2. Sameichel (overleg) 3 mrt 2015 23:06 (CET)[reageer]
  3. JAnstee (WMF) (overleg) 10 mrt 2015 20:16 (CET)[reageer]
  4. Axel Pettersson (WMSE) (overleg) 12 mrt 2015 14:52 (CET)[reageer]
  5. Add your username here.